Chapter III

(1 January to 31 December 1990) and

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1990 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter III, Appendix I

 

Atlantic deployment, extending operations in the Caribbean Sea, on her 2nd Shakedown Cruise, for CVW-13 Cyclic Operations (CO’s) and CQ’s (19 January to 23 February 1990); second Atlantic deployment, extending operations in the Caribbean Sea, on her 2nd Shakedown Cruise, for CO’s, CQ’s and established first logistics mobile beach detachment to support command's first REFTRA in the Caribbean Sea from NAS Jacksonville, Fla. to NAS Roosevelt Roads, P.R., and back to NAS Jacksonville (19 January to 23 February 1990); Stateside Operations ranging from ORSE (4 to 8 March 1990) and ISE off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) (28 February to 8 March 1990); conducted her final contract trials and Pre-INSURV (Board and Survey Inspection) in port Norfolk, Virginia on 8 March 1990; conducting a brief two-day Shakedown sail off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) (23 to 24 July 1990), to determine the success of the work accomplished during PSA, performed up the James River at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia (14 March to 22 July 1990); CVW-13 and SURFPAC NPMTT embarked and conducted ISE PALS certification off the Virginia capes (VACAPES); Dependent's Cruise; CVW-13 CQ’s off the Virginia capes (VACAPES); and made her first Southern Atlantic and Southern and Eastern Pacific deployment around Cape Horn, en route to its new Home Port and Transfer to the West Coast with CVW-11 embarked, conducting CVW-11 MISSILEX and CO’s in the Puerto Rican Operations Area and Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans (25 September to 20 November 1990) and Holidays Season and Christmas Stand Down.

1 January to 31 December 1990

Chapter III

 


USS
Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 1990 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate Naval tactical and support aircraft at sea, maintain open sea lanes for maritime traffic, project power both at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking Lincoln will also act as a command and control platform to direct and support battle group operations.

 

Wherever it goes, Lincoln shall serve as a symbol of U.S. resolve to provide a sea-based deterrent to threats of national interest. Command Master Chief -- AFCM Howard Rex Lincoln.

 

Abraham Lincoln is the nation's fifth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, and the newest in the U.S. arsenal. Built at a cost of over $3 billion dollars, Abraham Lincoln is the largest U.S. warship ever constructed. Commissioned November 11, 1989, Lincoln is the second ship of the line to be named for the sixteenth president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.

 

Abraham Lincoln is charged with supporting America's tactical air capability and maintaining open sea lanes. As it carries out this mission on the oceans of the world, Lincoln brings a message of peace through strength. Captain William B. Hayden commands Lincoln, with an assembled officer and crew complement of over 2,900 persons” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

In January 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) accomplishments included the establishment of SSO Defense Courier Service; APPS installed in MSI; NAVSECGRU training library established SSES; AV3MlNAVFLIRS installed; certified AIMD oil lab in accordance with JOAP programs and completed Vast station verification” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

S-6 Division of the Supply Department received their initial complement of aircraft engines in support of the first air wing flight operations aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 4 January 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Pier 12 South at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 31 December 1989 to 18 January 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-8 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia 19 January 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as the Commanding Officer, on her second Atlantic deployment, extending operations in the Caribbean Sea, on her 2nd Shakedown Cruise, for Cyclic Operations and Carrier Qualifications, CSQT structure test firing, CSQT missile exercise, FORACS noise measurement in the Puerto Rican OPAREA, NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System certification and established first logistics mobile beach detachment to support command's first REFTRA in the Caribbean Sea from NAS Jacksonville, Fla. to NAS Roosevelt Roads, P.R., and back to NAS Jacksonville, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-8 (AJ)

(19 January to 23 February 1990)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) – 2nd

SoLant

Caribbean Sea

CVW-8

AJ

19 Jan 1990

22 Feb 1990

Southern America

35-days

2nd Shakedown Cruise, for Cyclic Operations and Carrier Qualifications, CSQT structure test firing, CSQT missile exercise, FORACS noise measurement in the Puerto Rican OPAREA, NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System certification and established first logistics mobile beach detachment to support command's first REFTRA in the Caribbean Sea from NAS Jacksonville, Fla. to NAS Roosevelt Roads, P.R., and back to NAS Jacksonville.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-41

Black Aces -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK200

F/A-18A

VF-84

Jolly Rogers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK400

F/A-18A

VFA-15

Valions - Strike

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber

AK500

A-6E

VFA-87

Golden Warriors -

Strike Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VA-65

Tigers - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

VA-36

Roadrunners  -

Attack Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VAW-124

Bear Aces  -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-9

Sea Griffins - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VAQ-141

Shadowhawks -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-24

Scouts - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VRC-40 Det.

Rawhides - Fleet

Logistics Support Squadron

 

Grumman - Greyhound

xx

C-2A

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

“Aircraft from Fighter Squadron VF-41 and VF-84, Strike Fighter Squadron VFA-15 and VFA-87, Attack Squadrons VA-36 and VA-65, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron VAW-124, Air Antisubmarine Squadron VS-24, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS-9), Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-141 and Fleet Logistics Support Squadron VRC-40 Det. make up CVW-8” (Ref. 378A

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Port Everglades, Fla. on 14 February 1990, conducting CSQT structure test firing; CSQT missile exercise and FORACS noise measurements of the propulsion plant and hull was conducted off St. Croix, prior to arriving Port Everglades; while CVW-8 embarked conducted Cyclic Operations and Carrier Qualifications from 19 to 23 January 1989 off the east coast and off the Puerto Rican Operations Area, including North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Sea Sparrow missile system certification, noise measurement testing and similar procedures. Established first logistics mobile beach detachment to support command's first REFTRA in the Caribbean Sea from NAS Jacksonville, Fla. to NAS Roosevelt Roads, P.R., and back to NAS Jacksonville. The ship continued to utilize assets from CVW-8 to build proficiency in aircraft operations of the flight deck crew. Tomcats shot the initial imagery during missions from the ship utilizing Tactical Aerial Reconnaissance Pod System (TARPS) film. Additional accomplishments included NAL-4-1 exercise TARPS conducted by photo Lab and MSI; Ammunition offload from ammunition ship, USS Butte (AE-27); AIMD ran first F-404-GE-400, T58-GE-10 and J52P8B jet engines for training and AIMD composite repair shop certified for X-ray operations in February 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her first wing fly-off with all of the aircraft either fully or partially mission capable on 16 February 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Port Everglades, Fla. on 20 February 1990, embarking dependants and guest for a Tiger Cruise, in port from 14 to 19 February 1990, during which time the ship also accomplished her first wing fly-off with all of the aircraft either fully or partially mission capable on 16 February 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

On 23 February 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-8 embarked arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain William B. Hayden as the Commanding Officer, ending her second Atlantic deployment, extending operations in the Caribbean Sea, on her 2nd Shakedown Cruise, for Cyclic Operations and Carrier Qualifications, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Abraham Lincoln visited Port Everglades, Fla. on 14 February 1990, conducting CSQT structure test firing; CSQT missile exercise and FORACS noise measurements of the propulsion plant and hull was conducted off St. Croix, prior to arriving Port Everglades; while CVW-8 embarked conducted Cyclic Operations and Carrier Qualifications from 19 to 23 January 1989 off the east coast and off the Puerto Rican Operations Area, including North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Sea Sparrow missile system certification, noise measurement testing and similar procedures. Established first logistics mobile beach detachment to support command's first REFTRA in the Caribbean Sea from NAS Jacksonville, Fla. to NAS Roosevelt Roads, P.R., and back to NAS Jacksonville. The ship continued to utilize assets from CVW-8 to build proficiency in aircraft operations of the flight deck crew. Tomcats shot the initial imagery during missions from the ship utilizing Tactical Aerial Reconnaissance Pod System (TARPS) film. Additional accomplishments included NAL-4-1 exercise TARPS conducted by photo Lab and MSI; Ammunition offload from ammunition ship, USS Butte (AE-27); AIMD ran first F-404-GE-400, T58-GE-10 and J52P8B jet engines for training and AIMD composite repair shop certified for X-ray operations in February 1990. Abraham Lincoln conducted her first wing fly-off with all of the aircraft either fully or partially mission capable on 16 February 1990. Abraham Lincoln departed Port Everglades, Fla. on 20 February 1990, embarking dependants and guest for a Tiger Cruise, in port from 14 to 19 February 1990, during which time the ship also accomplished her first wing fly-off with all of the aircraft either fully or partially mission capable on 16 February 1990. Aircraft from Fighter Squadron VF-41, F-14A; VF-84, F-14A; Strike Fighter Squadrons VFA-15 and VFA-87 F/A-18As; Attack Squadrons VA-36 and VA-65 36, A-6Es; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron VAW-124, E-2C, Air Antisubmarine Squadron VS-24, S-3B; Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS-9) SH-3H; Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-141, EA-6B and Fleet Logistics Support Squadron VRC-40 Det., C-2A make up CVW-8. Port of call: Port Everglades, Fla. (19 January to 23 February 1990)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“In December 1989, Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) and Battle Group Foxtrot joined forces with the USS Midway (CVB-41) and Battle Group ALPHA near Manila Bay. Their mission was to support Operation Classic Resolve, conducting contingency operations if necessary to support U.S. interests following the Philippine coup attempt. Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) returned home through the Arabian Sea and the Atlantic Ocean leaving its ship, the "Big E", in Norfolk, Virginia for refueling. Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) underwent major changes in 1990. A-7E's were replaced by F/A-18 Hornets, and SH-3's were replaced with SH-60 Sea Hawks specially configured for combat search and rescue. The E-2C and the A-6E underwent major upgrades” (Ref. 72, 514 or Global Security)” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Pier 12 South at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 23 to 27 February 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 embarked departed Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia on 28 February 1990, for Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) and Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) off the Virginia capes (VACAPES)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 embarked returned to Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia on 8 March 1990, conducting Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) from 4 to 8 March 1990 and Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) from 28 February to 7 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced Pre-INSURV (Board and Survey Inspection) in port Norfolk, Virginia on 8 March 1990, conducting Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) from 4 to 8 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Pre-INSURV (Board and Survey Inspection) in port Norfolk, Virginia from 8 to 11 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her final contract trials and INSURV (Board and Survey Inspection) from 12 to 13 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was towed up the James River, commencing Post Shakedown Availability at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia on 14 March 1990. The emphasis for this availability was on habitability, equipment installation and upgrade and maintenance to existing equipment” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Communications Department V5 system conducted update from 19 to 30 March 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches beginning in April 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 3M assist visit conducted from 17 to 19 April 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

“Installation of new SUPPLOT begins aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in May 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) floated out of drydock at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia on 5 June 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

“In June 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) accomplishments included Drafting Shop installed in MSI; TAMPS cross-decked from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and installed in Mission Planning and in Debriefing; TFCC 11+ installation begins (FFDS installed in MSI) and Mine; torpedo readiness certification assist and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) NDI lab developed first X-ray film. Duty shuttle accident, Newport News on 10 June 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA on 1 July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was in port Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, for Post Shakedown Availability from 14 March to 15 July 1990, successfully completing propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA from 1 to 15 July 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia between 15 and 22 July 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia for Post Shakedown Availability from 14 March to 22 July 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches from April to July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) stood out of the channel after departing Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 23 July 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, for a brief two-day Shakedown sail off the Virginia capes (VACAPES), to determine the success of the work accomplished, in port Newport News SBDD, for Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) from 14 March to 22 July 1990, towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia between 15 and 22 July 1990. Abraham Lincoln was towed up the James River, commencing PSA at Newport News Shipbuilding on 14 March 1990. The emphasis for this availability was on habitability, equipment installation and upgrade and maintenance to existing equipment. Abraham Lincoln Communications Department V5 system conducted update from 19 to 30 March 1990, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches from April to July 1990, 3M assist visit conducted from 17 to 19 April 1990 and installation of new SUPPLOT begins aboard Abraham Lincoln in May 1990. In June 1990, Abraham Lincoln additional accomplishments included Drafting Shop installed in MSI; TAMPS cross-decked from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and installed in Mission Planning and in Debriefing; TFCC 11+ installation begins (FFDS installed in MSI) and Mine; torpedo readiness certification assist and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) NDI lab developed first X-ray film. Duty shuttle accident, Newport News on 10 June 1990. Abraham Lincoln floated out of drydock at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia on 5 June 1990, successfully completing propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA from 1 to 15 July 1990, and was towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia. In July, Abraham Lincoln accomplishments included Non-operational FIST cross-decked from CVN-65 and installed n MSI (to be returned to PACFLT; Pacific MC&G allowance begins arriving on board; Training and Readiness Evaluation (TRE) inspection by Cryptologic Readiness Group, NAVSECGRACT Northwest, Va. and Ammunition onload pierside” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 24 July 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, conducting a brief two-day Shakedown sail off the Virginia capes (VACAPES), to determine the success of the work accomplished during Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) from 14 March to 22 July 1990 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, successfully completing propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA from 1 to 15 July 1990, towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia between 15 and 22 July 1990. Abraham Lincoln was towed up the James River, commencing PSA at Newport News Shipbuilding on 14 March 1990. The emphasis for this availability was on habitability, equipment installation and upgrade and maintenance to existing equipment. Abraham Lincoln Communications Department V5 system conducted update from 19 to 30 March 1990, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches from April to July 1990, 3M assist visit conducted from 17 to 19 April 1990 and installation of new SUPPLOT begins aboard Abraham Lincoln in May 1990. In June 1990, Abraham Lincoln additional accomplishments included Drafting Shop installed in MSI; TAMPS cross-decked from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and installed in Mission Planning and in Debriefing; TFCC 11+ installation begins (FFDS installed in MSI) and Mine; torpedo readiness certification assist and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) NDI lab developed first X-ray film. Duty shuttle accident, Newport News on 10 June 1990. Abraham Lincoln floated out of drydock at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia on 5 June 1990, successfully completing propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA from 1 to 15 July 1990, and was towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia. In July, Abraham Lincoln accomplishments included Non-operational FIST cross-decked from CVN-65 and installed n MSI (to be returned to PACFLT; Pacific MC&G allowance begins arriving on board; Training and Readiness Evaluation (TRE) inspection by Cryptologic Readiness Group, NAVSECGRACT Northwest, Va. and Ammunition onload pierside” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Training Readiness Evaluation (TRE) was conducted from 25 to 27 July 1990, during which time CVW-11 visited from 25 to 26 July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 25 July to 1 August 1990, during which time Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches from April to July 1990 and Training Readiness Evaluation (TRE) was conducted from 25 to 27 July 1990, during which time an orientation visit from its assigned air wing, CVW-11 took place from 25 to 26 July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

“Iraqi tanks and troops poured across the borders from Iraq into Kuwait as Saddam Hussein’s troops raped and looted helpless Kuwaitis on 2 August 1990. Sailors on board guided missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG-49), patrolling in the Persian Gulf barely 50 miles offshore, could hear the victims’ pleas for help via their bridge-to-bridge radio, “over and over again,” but restrictive rules of engagement constrained the crew until the U.S. responded by forming a coalition of 29 nations, that rushed reinforcements to the region during Operation Desert Shield, designed to protect the region from Iraqi aggression. “Saddam Hussein won the toss, “CAPT Lyle G. “Ho Chi” Bien, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-15), detailed to Central Command as the Navy’s senior strike planner, noted, “and elected to receive.” The Navy augmented the Red Sea Battle Group’s mission to include maritime interception operations to enforce UN Security Council Resolution 51, which imposed an embargo upon ships entering or leaving Iraqi-occupied Kuwaiti and Iraqi ports. The Iraqi invasion led to Operations Desert Shield/Storm/Sabre, the coalition’s efforts to liberate Kuwait” (Ref. 378A).

 

“On 2 August 1990, Iraq invaded its neighbor Kuwait, and U.S. forces moved into Saudi Arabia as part of Operation Desert Shield to protect that country against invasion by Iraq” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

“After the 2 August 1990 Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, the largest armada since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield.  The Middle East Force found itself operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

“Through the 1980s several frigate- and destroyer-type ships and minesweepers were assigned to the Middle East Force as well as support ships. After the 2 August 1990 Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, the largest armada since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield. The Middle East Force found itself operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, that supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR), fulfilling the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number, while the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command” (Ref. 1-Saratoga, 72, 313 & 359).

 

USS Valcour (AGF-1), former AVP-55, a 1,766-ton Barnegat class small seaplane tender, was built at Houghton, Washington, and was commissioned in July 1946, became the first permanent flagship for the Middle East Force in 1961 after an extensive overhaul and redesignation as a miscellaneous command ship. In July 1972, USS La Salle (AGF-3) ex. USS La Salle (LPD-3) replaced Valcour as flagship. Middle East Force ships were the first U.S. military units to take action following the August 2, 1990, invasion of Kuwait when they began Maritime Interception Operations in support of United Nations sanctions against Iraq” (Ref. 359).

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-v/avp55.htm

 

“As a forward-deployed unit, USS La Salle (AGF-3) ex. USS La Salle (LPD-3) primary mission was to provide flagship facilities and support to Commander. Sixth Fleet (COMSIXTHFLT), and his embarked staff. La Salle assumed the role of flagship for the U.S. Sixth Fleet on 8 November 1994, bringing expanded capabilities to the Fleet. With the ability and space available to embark a Joint Task Force staff when necessary, La Salle greatly increases the flexibility of the U.S. Sixth Fleet Commander and his staff.

 

Additionally, La Salle was outfitted with state-of-the-art communication, command and control electronic equipment. Any operation or exercise involving sea, air, land, and amphibious forces can be controlled and directed from the flagship while at sea or in port. This further increased the U.S. Sixth Fleet's capability to respond to crisis or contingency operations. Following commissioning, La Salle served as flagship for Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Forces during the Dominican Crisis, and participated in the evacuation of Construction Battalion Six from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During 1969, La Salle served as the test platform for the prototype AV-8 Harrier Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) fighter bomber. In 1972, La Salle was designated a Miscellaneous Command Ship (AGF) and assumed duties as the flagship for Commander, Middle East Force. Forward-deployed to Bahrain, and painted white to reflect the Middle East Sun, "The Great White Ghost of the Arabian Coast" steamed an average of 55,000 miles annually in that role.

 

La Salle and five other ships in the Persian Gulf were the US Navy presence during the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on 02 August 1990. Over the course of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, La Salle assumed the added responsibility of controlling and coordinating the Maritime Intercept Force and served concurrently as flagship for Commander, US Naval Forces, Central Command. On March 12,1991, USS La Salle became the first United States Navy warship to enter the newly liberated port of Ash Shuaybay, Kuwait. USS La Salle became the US Sixth Fleet Command Ship on November 8, 1994. Prior to assuming the role of Sixth Fleet flagship, La Salle underwent an extensive yard period to upgrade her capabilities.

 

USS La Salle (AGF-3) was formally "laid to rest" during a pierside decommissioning ceremony 27 May 2005. La Salle was relieved of its flagship duties by USS Mount Whitney (LCC/JCC 20) during a change of flagship ceremony in Gaeta, Feb. 25, 2005. The ship arrived in Norfolk, va. on 17 March 2005 for the decommissioning process” (Ref.Global Security).

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/agf-3.htm

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 and SURFPAC NPMTT embarked, departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 2 August 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, for Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) PALS certification off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) from 28 February to 7 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 (AK)

(2 to 13 August 1990)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) – 2nd

Lant

(1)

CVW-13

AK

2 Aug 1990

13 Aug 1990

Training

CVW-13 and SURFPAC NPMTT embarked conducted Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) PALS certification off the Virginia capes (VACAPES).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-132

Privateers - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK200

F/A-18A

VFA-137

Kestrels - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK400

F/A-18A

VA-55 (2)

Warhorses - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber

AK500

A-6E

VAW-127 (3)

Seabats - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-142 (4)

Grim Watchdogs -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-17 (5)

Neptune's Riders - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

(1) CVW-13 deployed aboard the CVN-72 on latter half of the period

(2) VA-55 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991

(3) VAW-127 disestablished on Sep.30, 1991

(4) VAQ-142 disestablished on Jul.1, 1991

(5) HS-17 disestablished on Jun.30, 1991

F/A-18 Hornet, EA-6B Prowler and E-2C Hawkeye

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Electronic Warfare Onboard Trainer (EWOBT) was installed and training initiated on 4 August 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 and SURFPAC NPMTT embarked, returned to Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 13 August 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, conducting Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) PALS certification off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) from 2 to 12 August 1990. Aircraft from Fighter Squadron VFA-132 and VFA-137, Strike Fighter Squadron; Attack Squadron (VA-55) (2), Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW-127) (3); Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron (VAQ-142) (4) and Helicopter Anti-Submarine - (HS-17) (5) make up CVW-13. (1) CVW-13 deployed aboard the CVN-72 on latter half of the period; (2) VA-55 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991; (2) VAW-127 disestablished on Sep.30, 1991; (3) VAQ-142 disestablished on Jul.1, 1991 and (4) HS-17 disestablished on Jun.30, 1991.” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 14  August 1990, for a Dependent's Cruise, for nearly 5,000 guests” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 15 to 21 August 1990. During August FICPAC SAO package arrives, removal of portions of NIPS (V) 3 begins to accommodate NIPS (V) 4 Phase One in ANALYSIS, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) ran first GTC36-201 APU and AIMD issued first TF30-P414A ” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) First watch in SUPPLOT commenced on 22 August 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 22 August 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, for Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 (AK)

(22 to 29 August 1990)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) – 2nd

Lant

CVW-13

(1)

AK

22 Aug 1990

29 Aug 1990

Training

Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-132

Privateers - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK200

F/A-18A

VFA-137

Kestrels - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK400

F/A-18A

VA-55 (2)

Warhorses - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber

AK500

A-6E

VAW-127 (3)

Seabats - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-142 (4)

Grim Watchdogs -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-17 (5)

Neptune's Riders - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

 (1) CVW-13 deployed aboard the CVN-72 on latter half of the period

(2) VA-55 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991

(3) VAW-127 disestablished on Sep.30, 1991

(4) VAQ-142 disestablished on Jul.1, 1991

(5) HS-17 disestablished on Jun.30, 1991

F/A-18 Hornet, EA-6B Prowler and E-2C Hawkeye

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) SSES computer accreditation for SCI completed on 23 August 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

“Forty people from the National Association of Science Naval Studies Board embark USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from 23 to 24 August 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) underway off the coast of Virginia, 28 August 1990, prior to the ship's departure for the Pacific Fleet. A pair of F/A-18 Hornets are in launch positions on the bow catapults. Photo by PH1 Cummings. Joe Radigan, MACM, USN, Ret. NS027203. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027203.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 embarked returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 29 August 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, conducting Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) from 22 to 29 August 1990. Abraham Lincoln onloaded additional cargo from replenishment oiler Kalamazoo (AOR-6) and loaded ammunition pierside in August 1990. Abraham Lincoln SSES computer accreditation for SCI completed on 23 August 1990. Forty people from the National Association of Science Naval Studies Board embark Abraham Lincoln from 23 to 24 August 1990.

 

August was a heavy training month for the ship in preparation for the around the horn transit. Early August was spent at sea, continuing operational training with CVW-13. “Aircraft from Fighter Squadron VFA-132 and VFA-137, Strike Fighter Squadron; Attack Squadron VA-55, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron VAW-127; Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-142 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS-17) make up CVW-” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“Vice Adm. John H. Fetterman, Jr., Commander, Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 30 August 1990. During this period the crew performed their largest onload of supplies to date to prepare for their extended voyage that comprised over 1,000 pallets of stores, direct turn-over and squadron material” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“NALCOMIS software installation completed aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) making the command ADP fully operational on 5 September 1990” (Ref. Ref. 378B-1990).

 

“CMS inspection for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Communications Department was conducted on 7 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

“Tributary communications pre-groom/ANDVT(KW-5) install completed aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 18 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

“SUPPLOT installation complete (JOTS 11, POST, TRE installed) aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 24 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 29 August to 24 September 1990. CVW-11 onloaded and massive supply onload included over 1,000 pallets of stores, direct turn-over and squadron material on the 23rd. Abraham Lincoln accomplishments during September included NALCOMIS software installation completed, making the command ADP fully operational on 5 September 1990; CMS inspection for Communications Department was conducted on 7 September 1990; TIMS drop installed in MSI; NIPS (V) 4 phase one installation completed in ANALYSIS; TFCC 11+ installation completed; TRE installed; SSES receiver upgrade complete; hosted QUICKSTRIKE DST, ship's suitability test for NAVSEA assessment; Naval Intelligence Processing System (NIPS) interphase installed in Communications; AIMD Oil Lab was certified for Coolanol testing; Tributary communications pre-groom/ANDVT(KW-5) install completed, 18 September and SUPPLOT installation complete (JOTS 11, POST, TRE installed) on 24 September” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 25 September 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as the Commanding Officer, hosting Governor of Illinois, on her first Southern Atlantic and Southern and Eastern Pacific deployment around South America & Cape Horn, en route to its new Home Port and Transfer to the West Coast, conducting REFTRA, CVW-11 MISSILEX and Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area and Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, traveling through the Southern and Eastern Pacific to her new home port of Naval Air Station Alameda, California, operating with the Pacific Fleet. The embarked air wing was composed of aircraft from CVW-8, CVW-11 and CVWR-30 (approximately 60 total aircraft, making up CVW-11. Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) moved on board two days before they sailed on 23 September 1990. CVW-11’s new home port will be Naval Air Station Lemoore. Sailors draped banners that read “California or bust” and “Made in Va.” across her fantail. She will under go her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 (NH)

(25 September to 20 November 1990)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln        (CVN-72) – 2nd & Pacific Fleet

Solant

SoPac

Cape Horn

EastPac

CVW-11

NH

25 Sep 1990

20 Nov 1990

South America

West Coast Transfer

1st FWFD

57-days

Home Port and Transfer to the West Coast, conducting REFTRA, CVW-11 MISSILEX and Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area and Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VFA-303

Golden Hawks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

(ND) 300

F/A-18A

VFA-305

Lobos -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

(ND) 400

F/A-18A

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber

500

A-6E / KA-6D

Tanker

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-17 (*1)

Neptune's Riders - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

(AK) 610

SH-3H

VRC-30 Det.

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

(RW) 32, 34

C-2A

(*1) disestablished on Jun. 30, 1991

Carrier Air Wing Eleven underwent major changes in 1990. A-7E's were replaced by F/A-18 Hornets, and SH-3's were replaced with SH-60 Sea Hawks specially configured for combat search and rescue. The E-2C and the A-6E underwent major upgrades.

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

Guided missile frigate USS Doyle (FFG-39) accompanied USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) as part of her escort on its maiden voyage, riding it around South America en route to its new homeport in Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, while Carrier Air Wing Eleven embarked the Navy's newest carrier, making her homeport at Naval Air Station Lemoore” (Ref. 514 or Global Security).

 

In September 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Norfolk, Virginia, en route Alameda, California, and assignment to the Pacific Fleet. The embarked air wing was composed of aircraft from CVW-8, CVW-11 and CVWR-30 (approximately 60 total aircraft, making up CVW-11, transiting to Alameda, California with CVW-11 embarked, Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) was conducted. Governor of Illinois visited on the 25th and 26th” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted operations in the JAX OPAREA, transit PROA on 27 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a CVW-11 MISSILEX and Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area from 28 to 30 September 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands on 1 October 1990, where she will onload stores for the first time in a port outside of the continental U.S.” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed St. Thomas, Virgin Islands on 3 October 1990, onloading stores for the first time in a port outside of the continental U.S. from 1 to 3 October 1990. Lincoln then returned to sea to conduct two weeks of Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the Guantanamo Bay operating area with instructors room the U.S. Navy training facility. First parachute assembly packed fro 1 to 3 October” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) responded to counter-narcotics orders from Combined Joint Task Force 4 in the Caribbean Sea from 4 to 6 October 1990. At one point during the cycle of exercises, she sailed in company with USS Doyle (FFG-39) and MSC-operated oiler Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) on 6 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crossed the equator and conducted a "Shellback" initiation ceremony for the first time, and her historian proudly noted that “King Neptune” embarked on 9 October ” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her initial refueling of another ship at sea as she rendezvoused with USS Doyle (FFG-39) for an underway replenishment on 13 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Refresher Training (REFTRA), primarily off the waters of NS Guantánamo Bay, Cuba from 4 to 14 October 1990. At one point during the cycle of exercises, she sailed in company with USS Doyle (FFG-39) and MSC-operated oiler Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) on 6 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) entered Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 15 October1990, where she hosted a reception for 400 guests in Hanger Bay No. 215” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“Anti-nuclear protestors, demonstrated against USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) presence in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 17 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 19 October 1990, embarking a contingent of Argentinean naval officers. During her in port period, she hosted a reception for 400 guests in Hanger Bay No. 215, visiting from 15 to 18 October 1990, anti-nuclear protestors, marred the visit with demonstrations (17 October)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced participation in Exercise "Gringo Gaucho 11" with Argentina on 21 October 1990, hosting Argentine distinguished visitors, Argentine Naval Officers and Landing Signal Officers” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted practice bombing missions to Punta Indio target complex 22, 23 and 24 October 1990. Stock Control assumes control of all Q-COSAL on 22 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“The presence of the Argentineans’ became vital during Gringo-Gaucho II, an exercise with their forces from 21 to 25 October 1990. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began the exercise by hosting a visit of distinguished Argentinean visitors, including naval officers and landing signal officers. Carrier Air Wing Eleven Aircraft flew bombing runs against targets at the Punta Indigo range (22, 23 and 24 October 1990).

 

“The Americans also benefited from the unique opportunity of flying low-level reconnaissance missions over southern Argentina. Meanwhile, Argentinean Dassault Super Étendards and Grumman S-2E Trackers practiced ‘touch-and-go’ landings on board Abraham Lincoln. Stock Control assumes control of all Q-COSAL on 22 October 1990. Argentine Super Entendard and S-2E tracker aircraft conducted touch-and-go landings on Oct 23 and 24 and conducted low-level navigation flights over southern Argentina in the vicinity of TRELEW” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) rounded Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn) from 26 to 27 October 1990, traditionally one of the most dangerous and difficult voyages across the globe and graveyard of many ships, due to the foul weather that mariners usually encounter there” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“Successfully rounding Cape Horn, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) plowed through chill South Atlantic seas toward Chilean waters, where she took part in Blue Sky III, an AAWEX vs Chilean Air Force exercise with the Chileans on 28 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“Chilean Northrop F-5E Tiger IIs reciprocated and flew a strike against USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), and several Chilean diesel-powered submarines stalked the carrier from 29 to 30 October 1990 conducting Low levels Southern Chile in the vicinity of Puerto Montt on 29 October 1990, while Argentine Naval Officers disembarked, onboard from 19 to 30 October 1990, hosting Chilean DVs on the 30th. During All PPDB’s and 1990).

 

“After their arduous journey crewmembers of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Valparaíso, Chile on 31 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) enjoyed a visit to Valparaíso, Chile from 31 October to 4 November 1990, and then continued Blue Sky III, when the same day, tragedy interrupted, when aircraft accidentally bombed CVW-11 sailors near Viña del Mar, three of whom suffered superficial wounds on 4 November 1990. The Chileans helped the Americans as much as possible through the episode, though no one on either side claimed responsibility” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted Chilean DVs on 5 November 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

 

Valparaiso, Chile, November 1990. Photo by Gerhard Mueller-Debus. NS027248.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027248.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans from 28 October to 8 November 1990, that involved air combat training, an anti-air warfare exercise with the Chileans, and aircraft flew low-level navigation flights in the vicinity of Puerto Montt, Northern Chile, delta target complex usage in the vicinity of ANTOFAGASTA Airfield and Iquique Airfield from 6 to 8 November 1990. The allies culminated the exercise with an opposed U.S. training strike against Chilean defenders at Antofagasta and Iquique, Chile, and a pair of anti-air warfare exercises against the Chileans. Nov. 8 conducted raids on ANTOFAGASTA Airfield and Iquique, conducted two AAWEXs against Chilean Air Force. The first wall-to-wall inventory of a S-8 storeroom was completed using the integrated bar coding system on the 8th” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans from 28 October to 8 November 1990, that involved air combat training, an anti-air warfare exercise with the Chileans, and aircraft flew low-level navigation flights in the vicinity of Puerto Montt, Northern Chile, delta target complex usage in the vicinity of ANTOFAGASTA Airfield and Iquique Airfield from 6 to 8 November 1990. The allies culminated the exercise with an opposed U.S. training strike against Chilean defenders at Antofagasta and Iquique, Chile, and a pair of anti-air warfare exercises against the Chileans. Nov. 8 conducted raids on ANTOFAGASTA Airfield and Iquique, conducted two AAWEXs against Chilean Air Force. The first wall-to-wall inventory of a S-8 storeroom was completed using the integrated bar coding system on the 8” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced cyclic operations on 9 November 1990. Peruvian distinguished visitors embarked on board Abraham Lincoln as she conducted cyclic flight operations on 10 November 1990. During one of these flights, Abraham Lincoln recorded her 6,000th arrested landing, though an aircraft made a barricade landing at one point during these busy ” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) celebrated the one year anniversary of their ship's first birthday with a ‘steel beach’ [flight deck] picnic at sea on 11 November 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“CJTF 4 counter-narcotics tasking for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) again fulfilled counter-narcotics directions from Combined Joint Task Force 4, this time off the Galapagos Islands from 12 to 13 November 1990. In addition, aircraft flew low-level missions over Ecuadorian ranges (12 November)” (Ref. 378A).

 

“SSO functions, SCI billets transferred to PACFLT from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) INCHOP C3F/EASTPAC COMMS AREA on 14 November 1990. Also Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) ESD bench was established” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) accomplished counter-narcotics missions under the command of Combined Joint Task Force 5, while in the vicinity of Clipperton and Clarion Islands from 15 to 16 November 1990 and then steamed to Alamedia California” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

“TRE DE-INSTALL/cross-decked from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to USS Tarawa (LHA-1) on 18 November 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed to Alameda California from 17 to 18 November 1990” (Ref. 378A).

 

“On 20 November 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain William B. Hayden as the Commanding Officer, and began its holiday standdown period in their new home port, after sailing upward of 18,000 miles, disembarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base at Naval Air Station Lemoore, ending an inter fleet transfer from the Atlantic to the Pacific Fleet, on her first Southern Atlantic and Southern and Eastern Pacific deployment around South America & Cape Horn, en route to its new Home Port and Transfer to the West Coast, conducting CVW-11 MISSILEX and Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area and Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, traveling through the Southern and Eastern Pacific to her new home port of Naval Air Station Alameda, California operating with the Pacific Fleet, from Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. Abraham Lincoln’s crew trained extensively throughout the cruise, and conducted many carrier qualifications. Sailors and marines also accomplished exercises with both U.S. and allied forces including the Argentineans, Brazilians, Chileans, Peruvians and Uruguayans. In September 1990, Abraham Lincoln departed Norfolk, Virginia, en route Alameda, California, and assignment to the Pacific Fleet. The embarked air wing was composed of aircraft from CVW-8, CVW-11 and CVWR-30 (approximately 60 total aircraft, making up CVW-11, transiting to Alameda, California with CVW-11 embarked, Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) was  conducted. Governor of Illinois visted on the 25th and 26th. Guided missile frigate USS Doyle (FFG-39) accompanied Abraham Lincoln as part of her escort on its maiden voyage, riding it around South America en route to its new homeport in Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, while Carrier Air Wing Eleven embarked the Navy's newest carrier, making her homeport at Naval Air Station Lemoore. Abraham Lincoln conducted operations in the JAX OPAREA, transit PROA on 27 September 1990. Abraham Lincoln conducted a CVW-11 MISSILEX, CVW-11 Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area from 28 to 30 September 1990. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands on 3 October 1990, onloading stores for the first time in a port outside of the continental U.S. from 1 to 3 October 1990. Lincoln then returned to sea to conduct two weeks of Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the Guantanamo Bay operating area with instructors room the U.S. Navy training facility. First parachute assembly packed fro 1 to 3 October. Abraham Lincoln responded to counter-narcotics orders from Combined Joint Task Force 4 in the Caribbean Sea from 4 to 6 October 1990. At one point during the cycle of exercises, she sailed in company with USS Doyle (FFG-39) and MSC-operated oiler Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) on 6 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln crossed the equator and conducted a "Shellback" initiation ceremony for the first time, and her historian proudly noted that “King Neptune” embarked on 9 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln conducted her initial refueling of another ship at sea as she rendezvoused with USS Doyle (FFG-39) for an underway replenishment on 13 October 1990. Lincoln conducted Refresher Training (REFTRA), primarily off the waters of NS Guantánamo Bay, Cuba from 4 to 14 October 1990. At one point during the cycle of exercises, she sailed in company with USS Doyle (FFG-39) and MSC-operated oiler Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) on 6 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln entered Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 15 October1990, where she hosted a reception for 400 guests in Hanger Bay No. 215. Anti-nuclear protestors, demonstrated against Abraham Lincoln presence in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 17 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln departed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 19 October 1990, embarking a contingent of Argentinean naval officers. During her in port period, she hosted a reception for 400 guests in Hanger Bay No. 215, visiting from 15 to 18 October 1990, anti-nuclear protestors, marred the visit with demonstrations (17 October). Abraham Lincoln commenced participation in Exercise "Gringo Gaucho 11" with Argentina on 21 October 1990, hosting Argentine distinguished visitors, Argentine Naval Officers and Landing Signal Officers. Abraham Lincoln conducted practice bombing missions to Punta Indio target complex 22, 23 and 24 October 1990. Stock Control assumes control of all Q-COSAL on 22 October 1990. The presence of the Argentineans’ became vital during Gringo-Gaucho II, an exercise with their forces from 21 to 25 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln began the exercise by hosting a visit of distinguished Argentinean visitors, including naval officers and landing signal officers. Carrier Air Wing Eleven Aircraft flew bombing runs against targets at the Punta Indigo range (22, 23 and 24 October 1990). The Americans also benefited from the unique opportunity of flying low-level reconnaissance missions over southern Argentina. Meanwhile, Argentinean Dassault Super Étendards and Grumman S-2E Trackers practiced ‘touch-and-go’ landings on board Abraham Lincoln. Stock Control assumes control of all Q-COSAL on 22 October 1990. Argentine Super Entendard and S-2E tracker aircraft conducted touch-and-go landings on Oct 23 and 24 and conducted low-level navigation flights over southern Argentina in the vicinity of TRELEW. Abraham Lincoln rounded Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn) from 26 to 27 October 1990, traditionally one of the most dangerous and difficult voyages across the globe and graveyard of many ships, due to the foul weather that mariners usually encounter there. Successfully rounding Cape Horn, Abraham Lincoln plowed through chill South Atlantic seas toward Chilean waters, where she took part in Blue Sky III, an AAWEX vs Chilean Air Force exercise with the Chileans on 28 October 1990. Chilean Northrop F-5E Tiger IIs reciprocated and flew a strike against Abraham Lincoln, and several Chilean diesel-powered submarines stalked the carrier from 29 to 30 October 1990 conducting Low levels Southern Chile in the vicinity of Puerto Montt on 29 October 1990, while Argentine Naval Officers disembarked, onboard from 19 to 30 October 1990, hosting Chilean DVs on the 30th. During All PPDB’s and APPS software arrives in MSI and SAS program commences. After their arduous journey crewmembers of Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Valparaíso, Chile on 31 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln enjoyed a visit to Valparaíso, Chile from 31 October to 4 November 1990, and then continued Blue Sky III, when the same day, tragedy interrupted, when aircraft accidentally bombed CVW-11 sailors near Viña del Mar, three of whom suffered superficial wounds on 4 November 1990. The Chileans helped the Americans as much as possible through the episode, though no one on either side claimed responsibility. Abraham Lincoln hosted Chilean DVs on 5 November 1990. Abraham Lincoln conducted Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans from 28 October to 8 November 1990, that involved air combat training, an anti-air warfare exercise with the Chileans, and aircraft flew low-level navigation flights in the vicinity of Puerto Montt, Northern Chile, delta target complex usage in the vicinity of ANTOFAGASTA Airfield and Iquique Airfield from 6 to 8 November 1990. The allies culminated the exercise with an opposed U.S. training strike against Chilean defenders at Antofagasta and Iquique, Chile, and a pair of anti-air warfare exercises against the Chileans. Nov. 8 conducted raids on ANTOFAGASTA Airfield and Iquique, conducted two AAWEXs against Chilean Air Force. The first wall-to-wall inventory of a S-8 storeroom was completed using the integrated bar coding system on the 8th. CJTF 4 counter-narcotics tasking for Abraham Lincoln conducted in the vicinity of Galapagos Island from 12 to 13 November 1990. SSO functions, SCI billets transferred to PACFLT from Abraham Lincoln INCHOP C3F/EASTPAC COMMS AREA on 14 November 1990. Also Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) ESD bench was established. CJTF 5 counter-narcotics tasking for Abraham Lincoln conducted in the vicinity of Clipperton/Clarion Island from 15 to 16 November 1990. TRE DE-INSTALL/cross-decked from Abraham Lincoln to USS Tarawa (LHA-1) on 18 November 1990. Abraham Lincoln commenced cyclic operations on 9 November 1990. Peruvian distinguished visitors embarked on board Abraham Lincoln as she conducted cyclic flight operations on 10 November 1990. During one of these flights, Abraham Lincoln recorded her 6,000th arrested landing, though an aircraft made a barricade landing at one point during these busy events. Abraham Lincoln celebrated the one year anniversary of their ship's first birthday with a ‘steel beach’ [flight deck] picnic at sea on 11 November 1990. Abraham Lincoln again fulfilled counter-narcotics directions from Combined Joint Task Force 4, this time off the Galapagos Islands from 12 to 13 November 1990. In addition, aircraft flew low-level missions over Ecuadorian ranges (12 November). Abraham Lincoln Inchoped THIRDFLT on 14 November 1990. Abraham Lincoln accomplished counter-narcotics missions under the command of Combined Joint Task Force 5, while in the vicinity of Clipperton and Clarion Islands from 15 to 16 November 1990 and then steamed to Alamedia California. Abraham Lincoln steamed to Alameda California from 17 to 18 November 1990. Squadrons: VF-114, F-14A; VF-213, F-14A; VFA-303, F/A-18A; VFA-305, F/A-18A; VA-95, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-117, E-2C; HS-17 (*1), SH-3H; VAQ-135, EA-6B and VRC-30 Det., C-2A. (*1) disestablished on Jun.30, 1991. Ports of call: St. Thomas, Virgin Islands; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Singapore and Valparaíso, Chile. Her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (25 September to 20 November 1990)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“Adm. Bruce DeMars, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) at Naval Air Station Alameda, San Diego, California on 30 November 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

“UPQ-5 installed in DEBRIEFING on 20 December 1990 aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1990 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter III

Appendix I

 

The ship operated under the following chain of command as of 31 December 1990:

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990):

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 1990 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President George Herbert Walker Bush, 1989-1993 - 41st

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Richard B. Cheney - 17th
21 Mar 1989 - 20 Jan 1993

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Henry L. Garrett III - 63rd

15 May 1989 - 26 Jun 1992

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Carlisle Trost (1986–1990) - 23rd

ADM Frank B. Kelso (1990–1994) - 24th

CINCPACFLT

ADM David E. Jeremiah (1982–1986) - 50th

30 Sep 1987 - 15 Feb 1990

ADM Charles R. Larson - 51st

15 Feb 1990 - 15 Feb 1991

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM John H. Fetterman Jr. - 23rd

Aug 1987 - Dec 1990

VADM Edwin R. Kohn, Jr. - 24th

Dec 1990 - Oct 1993

COMCARGRU THREE

RADM Timothy W. Wright

 

Organization Structure. Captain William B. Hayden commands Abraham Lincoln, with an assembled officer and crew complement of over 2,900 persons.

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1990 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT William B. Hayden

Executive Officer - XO

CAPT Robert L. Peterson

Administrative Officer

LT George M. Schott

Air Officer

CDR Larry A. Pacentrilli

AIMD Officer

CDR Ken Marks

Combat Systems Officer

LCDR Daniel Rustchak

Religious Ministries Officer - RMD - Command Chaplain

CAPT John Robert Fiol

Dental Officer

CDR Peter G. Seder

Engineering Officer

CDR Richard Stuntz

Deck - First Lieutenant

LCDR Mark A. Sassaman

Communications Officer

LT Don Budde

Maintenance Officer

 

Legal Officer - Command Judge Advocate

LCDR Jim Norman

3-M Officer

Anthony E. Dames

Navigator

CDR Dave Smania

Senior Medical Officer

CDR Jerry Rose

Operations Officer

CDR Rocky Deal

Reactor Officer

CDR Kenneth J. Taplett

Safety Officer

CDR Larry Harvey

Supply Officer

CDR Dennis L. Wright

Deck Officer

ENS Stanley A. Mullen (acting)

Training Officer

LCDR Glenn Tyson

Weapons Officer

CDR Leslie Smith

Marine Security Detachment

Capt. Kenneth R. Lardie, USMC

 

Command.

 

Ship's complement:

Officers 152

Crew 2,752

 

“The following major accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 1990:

 

Abraham Lincoln is the nation's fifth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, and the newest in the U.S. arsenal. Built at a cost of over $3 billion dollars, Abraham Lincoln is the largest U.S. warship ever constructed. Commissioned November 11, 1989, Lincoln is the second ship of the line to be named for the sixteenth president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.

 

Abraham Lincoln is charged with supporting America's tactical air capability and maintaining open sea lanes. As it carries out this mission on the oceans of the world, Lincoln brings a message of peace through strength. Captain William B. Hayden commands Lincoln, with an assembled officer and crew complement of over 2,900 persons.

 

Lincoln was active in 1990. The ship completed operational, training and certification programs vital to its evolution as a fleet warship, including the qualification of the combat systems suite, proficiency certification for reactor watch standers, INSURV inspection, damage control and battle training, and operations competency training with various carrier air wings to train flight deck personnel.

 

This year's highlight was Lincoln’s South America transit. During the two month expedition, Lincoln participated in multinational training opportunities with the Navies and Air Forces of several South American countries including Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay and Peru.

 

The year culminated with Lincoln’s completion of a shift in homeports from Norfolk, Virginia, to Alameda, California, and inter-fleet transfer from the Atlantic to the Pacific Fleet. Lincoln continues to stay faithful to its motto, "Shall Not Perish," as it enters 1991 confident of its ability to protect and defend America's vital interests.

 

Certification was completed on Lincoln Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) Oil Lab. This provided Lincoln the ability to do oil trend analysis on board the ship for aircraft and machinery, alleviating the need to send these samples off the ship.

Cryptologic Combat Support Console (CCSC) was installed in SSES” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter III (1 January to 31 December 1990) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1990 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter III, Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4