Chapter IV (1 January to 31 December 1991) and

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1991 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter IV

Appendix I

 

 

Stateside Operations ranging from two stints of FRS CQ’s and ISE; CQs, Refresher Training (REFTRA) and ATA to ReadiEx 91-2B, a battle group exercise in Californian waters, during which aircraft flew over 460 sorties; First “WestPac” 91 deployment Annualex and Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine, anti-surface and anti-air warfare training MSDF Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine ASW, anti-surface and anti-air warfare ASUW, and AAW training, Operation Fiery Vigil, the evacuation of USAF and USN dependents trapped within the Philippines when the volcano Mount Pinatubo erupted, relocating approximately 45,000 people from the Subic Bay Naval Station to the port of Cebu in the Visayas, transiting the Strait of Malacca, conducting Malaysian Passex Exercise, that involves low level training flights, air-to-air and air-to-ground training flights with Malaysian forces and participated in Malaysian/Thai Passex Exercise, including low level training and dissimilar air combat training flights with Malaysian units; conducted E-2 linkex exercise with Thai units, her 1st Operation Desert Storm, supporting allied and U.S. troops remaining in the region for Desert Storm/Desert Sabre, during which time CVW-11, provided combat air patrols, reconnaissance and support air operations over Kuwait and Iraq, the first Iraq War, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait), on her first Gulf of Oman deployment in support of  Beacon Flash 4-91, which includes low level coordinated strikes, and air-to-air and surface exercises with Royal Omani air and naval forces and Al Hout 1/91, a Passex Exercise with the Omanis that included war-at-sea and antisubmarine scenarios, and or ASMDEX sorties (28 May to 25 November 1991) and Christmas Stand down.
1 January to 31 December 1991

Chapter IV

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 1991 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate Naval tactical and support aircraft at sea, maintain open sea lanes for maritime traffic, project power both at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Lincoln also serves as a command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group operations. Wherever it goes, Lincoln serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve to provide a sea-based deterrent to threats of national interest. Command Master Chief -- AVCM James L. Withycombe. Abraham Lincoln is the nation's fifth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, and the newest in the U.S. arsenal. Built at a cost of over $3 billion, Lincoln is the largest U.S. warship ever constructed. Commissioned November 11, 1989, Lincoln is the second ship of the line named for the sixteenth, and arguably, the greatest president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln is charged with supporting America's tactical air capability and maintaining open sea lanes. As it carries out this mission on the oceans of the world, Lincoln brings a message of peace through strength. Captain James O. Ellis Jr. Commands Lincoln and its officer and crew complement of over 2,600 persons” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

“President George H. W. Bush addressed the nation on 16 January 1991 at 9 p.m. EST and announced that the liberation of Kuwait from Iraq, Operation Desert Storm, had begun. The Navy launched 228 sorties from Ranger and USS Midway (CV-41) in the Persian Gulf, from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) en route to the Gulf, and from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), and USS America (CV-66) in the Red Sea. In addition, the Navy launched more than 100 Tomahawk missiles from nine ships in the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

“On 16 January 1991, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with Carrier Wing 3 embarked commenced attacks on Iraqi forces as part of Operation Desert Storm” (Ref. 72 & 76).

 

“In the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, Operation Desert Shield became Operation Desert Storm” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

“During Operation Desert Storm in 1991, Carriers operated under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command where it remained following the war. The Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command. Since the Gulf War, NAVCENT fulfilled the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command. Ships from the East and West Coasts comprised the fleet, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number” (Ref. 313 & 313A).

 

“On 27 February 1991, President George H. W. Bush declared a cease-fire in Iraq, and ordered all U.S. forces to stand down. With the presidential cease-fire in place, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) transited the Suez Canal for the fourth time in seven months and began its journey home” (Ref. 72 & 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 1 to 10 January 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 11 January 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 25 January 1991, conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) Carrier Qualifications (CQs), and Independent Steaming Exercise (ISE) in the Southern California (Socal) area of operation (AOO) from 11 to 25 January 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 5 January to 19 February 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 20 February 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 25 January 1991, conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) Carrier Qualifications (CQs), and Independent Steaming Exercise (ISE) in the Southern California (Socal) area of operation (AOO) from 20 to 27 February 199” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 28 February to 11 March 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 12 March 1991, for CVW-11 CQs, Refresher Training (REFTRA) and ATA” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 (NH)

(12 March to 14 April 1991)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet

EastPac

 

CVW-11

NH

12 Mar 1991

14 Apr 1991

Training Operations

34-days

CVW-11 CQs, Refresher Training (REFTRA) and ATA.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter -

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter -

NH200

F-14A

VFA-22

Fighting Redcocks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH300

FA-18C / NFA-18C

VFA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH400

FA-18C / NFA-18C

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine &  Search and Rescue

610

SH-3H / HH-60A

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-29

Dragonfires - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron or

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

(*1) disestablished on Apr.30, 1993

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 14 April 1991, conducting CVW-11 CQs, Refresher Training (REFTRA) and ATA, from 12 March to 14 April 1991. Completed ATA with over 350 sorties in a two and a half day period. CVW-11 Squadrons: VF-114, F-14A; VF-213, F-14A; VFA-22, FA-18C / NFA-18C; VFA-94, FA-18C / NFA-18C; VA-95, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-117, E-2C; HS-6, SH-3H / HH-60A; VAQ-135, EA-6B and VS-29, S-3B” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 15 to 28 April 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station Alameda, California on 29 April 1991” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Air Station Alameda, California on 9 May 1991, conducting ReadiEx 91-2B, a battle group exercise in Californian waters, during which aircraft flew over 460 sorties from 29 April to 9 May 1991” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 10 to 11 May 1991, with a Dependent's Day Cruise from the Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on the 11th, returning to port the same ” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 12 to 27 May ” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

 

At Alameda, California the day before USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1991 deployment. Photo by AMS3 Rick Rowan. NS027208.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027208.jpg

 

 

At Alameda, California the day before USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1991 deployment. Photo by AMS3 Rick Rowan. NS027209.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027209.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 28 May 1991, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Naval Air Station Lemoore, at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, with Captain William B. Hayden as the Commanding Officer, on her first “WestPac” 91 deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th  Fleet, conducting Annualex and Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine, anti-surface and anti-air warfare training MSDF Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine ASW, anti-surface and anti-air warfare ASUW, and AAW training, Operation Fiery Vigil, the evacuation of USAF and USN dependents trapped within the Philippines when the volcano Mount Pinatubo erupted, relocating approximately 45,000 people from the Subic Bay Naval Station to the port of Cebu in the Visayas, transiting the Strait of Malacca, conducting Malaysian Passex Exercise, that involves low level training flights, air-to-air and air-to-ground training flights with Malaysian forces and will participate in Malaysian/Thai Passex Exercise, including low level training and dissimilar air combat training flights with Malaysian units; conducting E-2 linkex exercise with Thai units, operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, that supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR), fulfilling the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number, while the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command, on her first Indian Ocean deployment, her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment (two cruises while on deployment) in support of her 1st Operation Desert Storm, supporting allied and U.S. troops remaining in the region for Desert Storm/Desert Sabre, during which time CVW-11, will provide combat air patrols, reconnaissance and support air operations over Kuwait and Iraq, the first Iraq War, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait), on her first Gulf of Oman in support of  Beacon Flash 4-91, which will include low level coordinated strikes, and air-to-air and surface exercises with Royal Omani air and naval forces and Al Hout 1/91, a Passex Exercise with the Omanis that included war-at-sea and antisubmarine scenarios, and or ASMDEX sorties. She will under go her second Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 (NH)

(28 May to 25 November 1991)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet, 7th & Central Command

(1st Arabian

/ Persian Gulf dep. (two cruises while on dep.))

1st WestPac  1st SCS

1st IO

1st Gulf of Oman

1st NorPac

 

CVW-11

NH

28 May 1991

25 Nov 1991

Western Pacific

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Persian Gulf

2nd FWFD

181-days

Annualex and Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine, anti-surface and anti-air warfare training MSDF Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine ASW, anti-surface and anti-air warfare ASUW, and AAW training, Operation Fiery Vigil, the evacuation of USAF and USN dependents trapped within the Philippines when the volcano Mount Pinatubo erupted, relocating approximately 45,000 people from the Subic Bay Naval Station to the port of Cebu in the Visayas, transiting the Strait of Malacca, conducting Malaysian Passex Exercise, that involves low level training flights, air-to-air and air-to-ground training flights with Malaysian forces and participated in Malaysian/Thai Passex Exercise, including low level training and dissimilar air combat training flights with Malaysian units; conducted E-2 linkex exercise with Thai units, her 1st Operation Desert Storm, supporting allied and U.S. troops remaining in the region for Desert Storm/Desert Sabre, during which time CVW-11, provided combat air patrols, reconnaissance and support air operations over Kuwait and Iraq, the first Iraq War, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait), on her first Gulf of Oman deployment in support of  Beacon Flash 4-91, which includes low level coordinated strikes, and air-to-air and surface exercises with Royal Omani air and naval forces and Al Hout 1/91, a Passex Exercise with the Omanis that included war-at-sea and antisubmarine scenarios, and or ASMDEX sorties.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114 (*1)

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VFA-22

Fighting Redcocks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH300

FA-18C / NFA-18C

VFA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH400

FA-18C / NFA-18C

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine &  Search and Rescue

610

SH-3H / HH-60A

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-29

Dragonfires - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron or

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

(*1) disestablished on Apr.30, 1993

 

The eight ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group Commanded by COMCARGRU 3, RADM Timothy W. Wright, deployed to the western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf, with Commander, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN, CAPT Stephen L. Webb embarked, the carrier’s first deployment outside of the Western Hemisphere, with Commodore Destroyer Squadron NINE, CAPT John F. Sussilleaux, and ships that include USS Lake Champlain (CG-57); USS Long Beach (CGN-9); USS Merrill (DD-976); USS Gary (FFG-51); USS Ingraham (FFG-61); USS Roanoke (AOR-7) joined USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A & 378A).

 

 

Underway in the Pacific Ocean in June 1991, with Carrier Air Wing 11 (CVW-11), during her maiden deployment. Replenishment oiler USS Roanoke (AOR-7) is in the background. US Navy photo by PH2 Didas (DVIC id: DN-SC-92-04519). NS027202. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027202.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) inchoped SEVENTHFLT area of Responsibility (AOR) on 11 June 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

“En route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Eastern and Western Pacific from 28 May to 17 June 1991, inchopping the  SEVENTHFLT area of Responsibility (AOR) on 11 June 1991, conducting Annualex from 28 May to 12 June 1991, during which time, the aircraft carrier was diverted to support evacuation operations following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo, on Luzon island in the Republic of the Philippines on 12 June 1991” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) entered the South China Sea to commence participation in Operation Fiery Vigil on 17 June 1991, the evacuation of USAF and USN dependents trapped within the Philippines when the volcano Mount Pinatubo erupted on 12 June 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

“En route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Eastern and Western Pacific from 28 May to 16 June 1991. Captain James O. Ellis, Jr. assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 16 June 1991, relieving Captain William B. Hayden, third Commanding Officer, serving from 13 December 1988 to 16 June 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in Operation Fiery Vigil, the evacuation of USAF and USN dependents trapped within the Philippines when the volcano Mount Pinatubo erupted on 12 June 1991, operating on station from 17 to 23 June 1991. The mountain’s fury blackened the skies across Angeles City and much of the main Filipino island of Luzon for nearly 36 hours, and Typhoon Yunya added to the devastation when it slammed inland with fierce winds and rain. The rain eventually cleared the atmosphere of most of the choking and blinding ash, but the disaster deposited a heavy eight-inch coating of grey ash over much of the area around NS Subic Bay and NAS Cubi Point, and sailors observed that the residue gave the landscape the appearance of dry cement. The ash crushed many lightweight structures, and a chalky film covered the bay, which presented the appearance of a translucent shade of green. The disaster cut electricity and water to the base for two days, and only heavy trucks could grind their way through the morass to reach victims. Rescue workers also contended with earthquake aftershocks. Thousands of Filipino looters, however, magnified the tragedy by adding a dark note to the heroic efforts of rescuers when lawless elements climbed over the gates and ransacked abandoned homes. In many instances the looters wiped out everything of value for entire families including treasured mementoes, and so many swamped the gates that they overwhelmed military policemen by their sheer numbers and determination.

 

Abraham Lincoln transported 4,323 people, mostly USN and USAF dependents from Subic Bay and Cubi Point and from Clark Air Base (AB) to Cebu City on Cebu, for further evacuation to Guam and the continental U.S. Sailors and marines also brought on board as many pets as they could save, becoming the largest peacetime evacuation of active duty military personnel and family members in history, sea lifting 20,000 evacuees, accompanied with a 23-ship armada that participated in Operation Fiery Vigil, relocating approximately 45,000 people from from the Subic Bay Naval Station to the port of Cebu in the Visayas. Crewmembers recorded over 250 helo lifts required to off-load evacuees and over 500 pets, and the ship’s historian noted that the sailors and marines performed the “Herculean effort…efficiently and with compassion.”

 

Sailors surrendered berths to exhausted people, and those of the Medical Department provided special medications, diapers, formula, baby food and hygiene articles to evacuees. Among the aircraft that transferred to make room on board for people, were five from VA-95 that flew ashore to Kadena AB on Okinawa. “This is the best treatment I’ve had in more than a week,” Sgt. Tony Ellis, assigned to the USAF 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing, said. “Sailors stopped and asked us if we needed help if we looked lost. We could have been going in the opposite direction and they would turn around and go all the way to the other end of the ship just to help us find our way. These guys are great!” Crewmembers generously raised more than $12,000.00 to aid victims.

 

Sailors converted sections of Hanger Bay No. 3 into what they called “The Dog Pound” for the myriad of evacuated pets. One sailor slept on a piece of cardboard covered by frightened Dachshunds, and sailors and marines built a variety of shelters to accommodate dogs and cats. “The challenges came in the form of puppies,” EM1 Richard Cunningham, who supervised the pet shelters, explained. “We have a Doberman with nine pups. There’s a sign up to warn people to keep their fingers out of the travel case [from the protective mother].” Cunningham noted that he enjoyed working around most of the animals, especially friendly canines.

 

“They love to cuddle, and they really appreciate attention.” Abraham Lincoln sailed more than 1,800 nautical miles through inshore waters, which required careful attention to detail from her Navigation Department due to other vessels, treacherous shoals and currents. The ship also supported guided missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) as she evacuated a further 844 people and their pets during three trips in and out of the disaster area. Lake Champlain’s historian noted that the devastation and the suffering of the victims “overwhelmed” her crewmembers.

 

Abraham Lincoln took up station in the Arabian/Persian  Gulf in support of allied and U.S. troops remaining in the region for Operation Desert Storm, during which time CVW-11, provided combat air patrols, reconnaissance and support air operations over Kuwait and Iraq, remaining on station for three months” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1991).

 

“En route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Eastern and Western Pacific from 28 May to 16 June 1991. Captain James O. Ellis, Jr. assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 16 June 1991, relieving Captain William B. Hayden, third Commanding Officer, serving from 13 December 1988 to 16 June 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

On 29 June 1991, two F-14A ("201" and "205") of VF-213 attached to CVW-11 embarked onboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), were involved in a mid-air collision in the South China Sea. One F-14 ("201") crashed into the sea, the crew was rescued, and the other aircraft diverted to Singapore(Ref. 84A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operated in the South China Sea from 24 June to 31 June 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Singapore on 4 July 1991, visiting from 1 to 4 July 1991, following which the ship headed to the Strait of Malacca” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) transited the Strait of Malacca from 5 to 6 July 1991, conducting Malaysian Passex Exercise, that involved low level training flights, air-to-air and air-to-ground training flights with Malaysian forces from 6 to 7 July 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

On 8 July 1991, an F-14A ("203") of VF-213 attached to CVW-11 embarked onboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crashed into the sea off Sri Lanka, the crew was rescued by a helicopter of HS-6 and Lincoln entered the Indian Ocean for the first time” (Ref. 84A).

Green Lizard 515, a Grumman KA-6D tanker, Lt. Mark S. Baden and Lt. Keith Gallagher of VA-95, experienced mechanical problems (possibly generated by a stuck float valve) while flying at about 8,000 feet, around seven miles abeam from the ship and heading away from her, as the ship was operating in the Indian Ocean, sailing northwesterly courses toward the Persian Gulf on 9 July 1991. As Baden eased the Intruder up, speed about 230 knots, Gallagher suddenly smashed through the canopy in a partial ejection. The cockpit depressurized and the tremendous pressure from the wind tore Gallagher’s helmet and oxygen mask off, as the bombardier/navigator’s head, arms and upper torso emerged into the windstream and he struggled against the elements.

 

“The wind had become physically and emotionally overwhelming,” Gallagher described his terrifying experience. “It pounded against my face and body like a huge wall of water that wouldn’t stop.” The stresses suffocated Gallagher and as he fought to keep from passing out, he remembered his wife and said to himself “I don’t want to die” just before he lost consciousness.

 

In what the squadron historian accurately described as “superb airmanship,” Baden managed to land the aircraft aboard Abraham Lincoln, while the navigator remained 6 minutes halfway outside the canopy from when Gallagher thrust through the Plexiglas and with his parachute entangled around the Intruder’s horizontal stabilizer. Sailors cleared the flight deck, and rapidly hooked-up and towed several aircraft out of the landing area to enable 515 to recover. The intrepid aviator worked his way through physical therapy and recovered to complete his naval service. The accident occurred on Gallagher’s 26th birthday. Click here for a detailed report of the accident including pictures and sound files(Ref. 84A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Inchoped CENTCOM on 11 July 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (Abe) steamed through the Indian Ocean from 8 to 12 July 1991, entering the Arabian Sea en route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf, steaming through the Gulf of Oman, Abe entered the Strait of Hormuz and Persian Gulf on 13 July 1991, during which time CAP, ESM, and AEW sorties in support of CINCCENT tasking during postwar period of Operation Desert Storm begaan” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) turned over to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 16 July 1991 and sailed through the Persian Gulf through to the Strait of Hormuz eastbound and headed home ” (Ref. 372A).

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) at Dubai, U.A.E.. Photo by AMS3 Rick Rowan. NS027211.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027211.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Dubai on 13 August 1991, operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, providing CAP, ESM, and AEW sorties in support of CINCCENT tasking during postwar period of Operation Desert Storm from 13 July to 12 August 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Dubai from 13 to 16 August 1991, reentering the Arabian/Persian Gulf on 17 August 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

“On 24 August 1991, an F/A-18 ("304") of VFA-94 attached to CVW-11 embarked onboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, crashed into the sea after being catapulted off the deck. The pilot ejected and was rescued shortly afterwards.  Initially, a cold cat was thought to be the reason for the accident. After the incident it was found that the aircraft had an engine failure, which was believed to be caused by FOD at the time of launch. The "fodded" engine blew scrapnel into the other engine. Both engines failed and the plane crashed into the ocean after the cat launch(Ref. 84A).

 

Battle Group Foxtrot became the first carrier battle group to operate in the Arabian/Persian Gulf during the summer months, enduring the extreme heat of the region and reduced visibility due to Kuwaiti oil fires” (Ref. 444 & 72).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Dubai from 15 to 20 September 1991, operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, providing CAP, ESM, and AEW sorties in support of CINCCENT tasking during postwar period of Operation Desert Storm from 17 August to 14 September 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) reentered the Strait of Hormuz on 27 September 1991, operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, providing CAP, ESM, and AEW sorties in support of CINCCENT tasking during postwar period of Operation Desert Storm from 13 July to 12 August 1991, from 17 August to 14 September 1991 and from 21 to 26 September 1991, making two in port periods at Dubai from 13 to 16 August 1991 and from 15 to 20 September 1991. Abraham Lincoln passed through the Strait of Hormuz and sailed in the Arabian/Persian Gulf for her initial deployment to those waters from 13 July to 27 September 1991. During the fighting in Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm/Desert Sabre, the Iraqis set many oil refineries and drills afire, a crime which the Department of Defense branded “an act of environmental terrorism.” The rising flames and smoke plumes impeded aircraft flying missions through them and posed challenging navigational hazards for pilots.

 

In addition, a thick haze blanketed the area due to the high humidity common to the region. The Iraqis also dumped several million barrels of oil into the Arabian/Persian Gulf from their Sea Island crude oil tanker loading terminal off the Kuwaiti coast, and from five pre-positioned tankers in the occupied Kuwaiti port of Mina’ al Ahmadi, which they drained of oil and pumped overboard. They increased the devastation when they pumped additional oil from storage tanks ashore through an underwater pipeline into the waters of the Gulf, which impacted ships sailing in those waters. Men kept Abraham Lincoln on station despite propulsion plant space temperatures that sometimes reached in excess of 110°F, and maintained full plant capabilities while sailing in seawater that reached 95°F. Abraham Lincoln enforced United Nations sanctions against the Iraqis following Persian Gulf War I, and provided 212 combat air patrol, 206 airborne early warning, 19 TARPS and a number of electronic support measures sorties in support of allied tasking.

 

USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) proceeded ahead of the carrier and as the cruiser passed through the strait, an Iranian warship sailed from outbound shipping lanes and crossed in front of her, however, Omani authorities took the Iranians to task for their disregard of international rules of the road (14 July). Meanwhile, aircraft from the carrier completed the first in a series of long range raids into Kuwaiti and Saudi airspace to practice high altitude strike capabilities (23 July). As anti-surface warfare commander, the ship planned, coordinated and executed the hunt for an Iraqi myam mine that drifted dangerously into shipping lanes, and located and destroyed the device (2 August). In doing so, the carrier prevented the rest of the ships from having to conduct an emergency dispersal. At various times she operated with British, French, Japanese, Malaysian, Omani, Saudi Arabian and Thai forces. A-6E Intruders from VA-95 flew a strike mission for their first time carrying main armament loads of AGM-84E Standoff Land Attack Missiles (SLAMs). Abraham Lincoln also took part in Al Hamra, an exercise with the United Arab Emirates (UAE)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed from the Arabian/Persian Gulf on 27 September 1991, through to the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman on the 28th, participated in Beacon Flash 4-91, which includes low level coordinated strikes, and air-to-air and surface exercises with Royal Omani air and naval forces” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operated in the Gulf of Oman, participating in Beacon Flash 4-91, low level coordinated strikes, air-to-air and surface exercises with Royal Omani Air Force and Navy units from 28 September to 3 October 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) reentered the Strait of Hormuz a third time on 4 October 1991, en route to the Persian Gulf, for  the purpose of a third port call at Dubai from 5 to 11 October 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) reentered the Strait of Hormuz a fourth time on 12 October 1991, having deployed to the Arabian/Persian Gulf a second time while on deployment, en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California via the Gulf of Oman,  Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean, Strait of Malacca, South China Sea, Western and Eastern Pacific” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) took part in Al Hout 1/91, a Passex Exercise with the Omanis that included war-at-sea and antisubmarine scenarios, and or ASMDEX sorties commencing on 15 October 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in Malaysian/Thai Passex Exercise, including low level training and dissimilar air combat training flights with Malaysian units; conducted E-2 linkex exercise with Thai units on 21 October 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) inchoped SEVENTHFLT area of Responsibility (AOR) on 17 October 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (Abe), en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, Abe took part in Al Hout 1/91, a Passex Exercise with the Omanis in the Gulf of Oman, that included war-at-sea and antisubmarine scenarios, and or ASMDEX sorties on 15 October 1991, conducting passage from the Strait of Hormuz through to the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean from 13 to 21 October 1991, Abe participated in Malaysian/Thai Passex Exercise, including low level training and dissimilar air combat training flights with Malaysian units; conducted E-2 linkex exercise with Thai units on 21 October 1991, inchopping the SEVENTHFLT area of Responsibility (AOR) on 17 October 1991, en route to the Strait of Malacca, South China Sea, Western and Eastern Pacific on her way home, transiting the  Straits of Malacca on 22 October 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) transited the South China Sea from 23 to 25 October 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) stood out from Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines for Hong Kong on 29 October 1991, moored at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 26 to 29 October 1991” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operated in the South China Sea from 30 to 31 October 1991, en route to Hong Kong” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Hong Kong from 1 to 5 November, then sailed for the waters of the North Pacific” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in MSDF Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine ASW, anti-surface and anti-air warfare ASUW, and AAW training. Maintained continuous on station ASW coverage for 50 hours from 8 to 9 November 1991. Abraham Lincoln maintained 50 hours of continuous on station submarine hunting coverage” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) inchoped THIRDFLT area of Responsibility (AOR) on 13 November 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) transited the North, West and Eastern Pacific from 6 to 25 November 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

“On 25 November 1991, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, disembarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Naval Air Station Lemoore, at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, with Captain James O. Ellis, Jr., relieving Captain William B. Hayden, third Commanding Officer, serving from 13 December 1988 to 16 June 1991, ending her first “WestPac” 91 deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th  Fleet, conducting Annualex and Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine, anti-surface and anti-air warfare training MSDF Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine ASW, anti-surface and anti-air warfare ASUW, and AAW training, Operation Fiery Vigil, the evacuation of USAF and USN dependents trapped within the Philippines when the volcano Mount Pinatubo erupted, relocating approximately 45,000 people from the Subic Bay Naval Station to the port of Cebu in the Visayas, transiting the Strait of Malacca, conducting Malaysian Passex Exercise, that involved low level training flights, air-to-air and air-to-ground training flights with Malaysian forces and will participate in Malaysian/Thai Passex Exercise, including low level training and dissimilar air combat training flights with Malaysian units; conducted E-2 linkex exercise with Thai units, operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, that supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR), fulfilling the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number, while the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command, on her first Indian Ocean deployment, her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment (two cruises while on deployment) in support of her 1st Operation Desert Storm, supporting allied and U.S. troops remaining in the region for Desert Storm/Desert Sabre, during which time CVW-11, will provide combat air patrols, reconnaissance and support air operations over Kuwait and Iraq, the first Iraq War, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait), on her first Gulf of Oman in support of  Beacon Flash 4-91, which included low level coordinated strikes, and air-to-air and surface exercises with Royal Omani air and naval forces and Al Hout 1/91, a Passex Exercise with the Omanis that included war-at-sea and antisubmarine scenarios, and or ASMDEX sorties. Inchopping the SEVENTHFLT area of Responsibility (AOR) on 11 June 1991, Abraham Lincoln conducted Annualex from 28 May to 12 June 1991, during which time, the aircraft carrier was diverted to support evacuation operations following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo, on Luzon island in the Republic of the Philippines on 12 June 1991. Abraham Lincoln entered the South China Sea to commence participation in Operation Fiery Vigil on 17 June 1991, the evacuation of USAF and USN dependents trapped within the Philippines when the volcano Mount Pinatubo erupted on 12 June 1991. En route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf, Abraham Lincoln steamed through the Eastern and Western Pacific from 28 May to 16 June 1991. Captain James O. Ellis, Jr. assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 16 June 1991, relieving Captain William B. Hayden, third Commanding Officer, serving from 13 December 1988 to 16 June 1991. Captain James O. Ellis, Jr. assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 16 June 1991, relieving Captain William B. Hayden, third Commanding Officer, serving from 13 December 1988 to 16 June 1991. On 29 June 1991, two F-14A ("201" and "205") of VF-213 attached to CVW-11 embarked onboard Abraham Lincoln, were involved in a mid-air collision in the South China Sea. One F-14 ("201") crashed into the sea, the crew was rescued, and the other aircraft diverted to Singapore, operating in the South China Sea from 24 June to 31 June 1991. Abraham Lincoln crew celebrated Independence Day with a visit to Singapore on 1 July 1991. Abraham Lincoln departed Singapore on 4 July 1991, visiting from 1 to 4 July 1991, following which the ship headed to the Strait of Malacca, transiting the Strait of Malacca from 5 to 6 July 1991, conducting Malaysian Passex Exercise, that involved low level training flights, air-to-air and air-to-ground training flights with Malaysian forces from 6 to 7 July 1991. On 8 July 1991, an F-14A ("203") of VF-213 attached to CVW-11 embarked onboard Abraham Lincoln crashed into the sea off Sri Lanka, the crew was rescued by a helicopter of HS-6 and Lincoln entered the Indian Ocean for the first time. Green Lizard 515, a Grumman KA-6D tanker, Lt. Mark S. Baden and Lt. Keith Gallagher of VA-95, experienced mechanical problems (possibly generated by a stuck float valve) while flying at about 8,000 feet, around seven miles abeam from the ship and heading away from her, as the ship was operating in the Indian Ocean, sailing northwesterly courses toward the Persian Gulf on 9 July 1991. As Baden eased the Intruder up, speed about 230 knots, Gallagher suddenly smashed through the canopy in a partial ejection. The cockpit depressurized and the tremendous pressure from the wind tore Gallagher’s helmet and oxygen mask off, as the bombardier/navigator’s head, arms and upper torso emerged into the windstream and he struggled against the elements. “The wind had become physically and emotionally overwhelming,” Gallagher described his terrifying experience. “It pounded against my face and body like a huge wall of water that wouldn’t stop.” The stresses suffocated Gallagher and as he fought to keep from passing out, he remembered his wife and said to himself “I don’t want to die” just before he lost consciousness. In what the squadron historian accurately described as “superb airmanship,” Baden managed to land the aircraft aboard Abraham Lincoln, while the navigator remained 6 minutes halfway outside the canopy from when Gallagher thrust through the Plexiglas and with his parachute entangled around the Intruder’s horizontal stabilizer. Sailors cleared the flight deck, and rapidly hooked-up and towed several aircraft out of the landing area to enable 515 to recover. The intrepid aviator worked his way through physical therapy and recovered to complete his naval service. The accident occurred on Gallagher’s 26th birthday. The accident occurred on Gallagher’s 26th birthday. detailed report of the accident including pictures and sound at: http://www.gallagherstory.com/ejection_seat. Abraham Lincoln inchoped CENTCOM AOR on 11 July 1991, steaming through the Indian Ocean from 8 to 12 July 1991, entering the Arabian Sea en route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf, steaming through the Gulf of Oman, Abe entered the Strait of Hormuz and Persian Gulf on 13 July 1991, during which time CAP, ESM, and AEW sorties in support of CINCCENT tasking during postwar period of Operation Desert Storm began. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Dubai from 13 to 16 August 1991, operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, providing CAP, ESM, and AEW sorties in support of CINCCENT tasking during postwar period of Operation Desert Storm from 13 July to 12 August 1991. Abraham Lincoln reentered the Arabian/Persian Gulf on 17 August 1991. On 24 August 1991, an F/A-18 ("304") of VFA-94 attached to CVW-11 embarked onboard Abraham Lincoln operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, crashed into the sea after being catapulted off the deck. The pilot ejected and was rescued shortly afterwards.  Initially, a cold cat was thought to be the reason for the accident. After the incident it was found that the aircraft had an engine failure, which was believed to be caused by FOD at the time of launch. The "fodded" engine blew scrapnel into the other engine. Both engines failed and the plane crashed into the ocean after the cat launch. Battle Group Foxtrot became the first carrier battle group to operate in the Arabian/Persian Gulf during the summer months, enduring the extreme heat of the region and reduced visibility due to Kuwaiti oil fires. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Dubai from 15 to 20 September 1991, operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, providing CAP, ESM, and AEW sorties in support of CINCCENT tasking during postwar period of Operation Desert Storm from 17 August to 14 September 1991. Abraham Lincoln reentered the Strait of Hormuz on 27 September 1991, operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, providing CAP, ESM, and AEW sorties in support of CINCCENT tasking during postwar period of Operation Desert Storm from 13 July to 12 August 1991, from 17 August to 14 September 1991 and from 21 to 26 September 1991, making two in port periods at Dubai from 13 to 16 August 1991 and from 15 to 20 September 1991. Abraham Lincoln passed through the Strait of Hormuz and sailed in the Arabian/Persian Gulf for her initial deployment to those waters from 13 July to 27 September 1991. During the fighting in Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm/Desert Sabre, the Iraqis set many oil refineries and drills afire, a crime which the Department of Defense branded “an act of environmental terrorism.” The rising flames and smoke plumes impeded aircraft flying missions through them and posed challenging navigational hazards for pilots. In addition, a thick haze blanketed the area due to the high humidity common to the region. The Iraqis also dumped several million barrels of oil into the Arabian/Persian Gulf from their Sea Island crude oil tanker loading terminal off the Kuwaiti coast, and from five pre-positioned tankers in the occupied Kuwaiti port of Mina’ al Ahmadi, which they drained of oil and pumped overboard. They increased the devastation when they pumped additional oil from storage tanks ashore through an underwater pipeline into the waters of the Gulf, which impacted ships sailing in those waters. Men kept Abraham Lincoln on station despite propulsion plant space temperatures that sometimes reached in excess of 110°F, and maintained full plant capabilities while sailing in seawater that reached 95°F. Abraham Lincoln enforced United Nations sanctions against the Iraqis following Persian Gulf War I, and provided 212 combat air patrol, 206 airborne early warning, 19 TARPS and a number of electronic support measures sorties in support of allied tasking. USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) proceeded ahead of the carrier and as the cruiser passed through the strait, an Iranian warship sailed from outbound shipping lanes and crossed in front of her, however, Omani authorities took the Iranians to task for their disregard of international rules of the road (14 July). Meanwhile, aircraft from the carrier completed the first in a series of long range raids into Kuwaiti and Saudi airspace to practice high altitude strike capabilities (23 July). As anti-surface warfare commander, the ship planned, coordinated and executed the hunt for an Iraqi myam mine that drifted dangerously into shipping lanes, and located and destroyed the device (2 August). In doing so, the carrier prevented the rest of the ships from having to conduct an emergency dispersal. At various times she operated with British, French, Japanese, Malaysian, Omani, Saudi Arabian and Thai forces. A-6E Intruders from VA-95 flew a strike mission for their first time carrying main armament loads of AGM-84E Standoff Land Attack Missiles (SLAMs). Abraham Lincoln also took part in Al Hamra, an exercise with the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Abraham Lincoln steamed from the Arabian/Persian Gulf on 27 September 1991, through to the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman on the 28th, participating in Beacon Flash 4-91, which included low level coordinated strikes, air-to-air and surface exercises with Royal Omani Air Force and Navy units from 28 September to 3 October 1991. Abraham Lincoln reentered the Strait of Hormuz a third time on 4 October 1991, en route to the Persian Gulf, for  the purpose of a third port call at Dubai from 5 to 11 October 1991. Abraham Lincoln reentered the Strait of Hormuz a fourth time on 12 October 1991, having deployed to the Arabian/Persian Gulf a second time while on deployment, en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California via the Gulf of Oman,  Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean, Strait of Malacca, South China Sea, Western and Eastern Pacific. Abraham Lincoln took part in Al Hout 1/91, a Passex Exercise with the Omanis that included war-at-sea and antisubmarine scenarios, and or ASMDEX sorties on 15 October 1991, Abraham Lincoln participated in Malaysian/Thai Passex Exercise, including low level training and dissimilar air combat training flights with Malaysian units; conducted E-2 linkex exercise with Thai units on 21 October 1991. Abraham Lincoln inchoped the SEVENTHFLT AOR on 17 October 1991. Abraham Lincoln, en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, Abe took part in Al Hout 1/91, a Passex Exercise with the Omanis in the Gulf of Oman, that included war-at-sea and antisubmarine scenarios, and or ASMDEX sorties on 15 October 1991, conducting passage from the Strait of Hormuz through to the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean from 13 to 21 October 1991, Abraham Lincoln participated in Malaysian/Thai Passex Exercise, including low level training and dissimilar air combat training flights with Malaysian units; conducted E-2 linkex exercise with Thai units on 21 October 1991, inchopping the SEVENTHFLT AOR on 17 October 1991, en route to the Strait of Malacca, South China Sea, Western and Eastern Pacific on her way home, transiting the  Straits of Malacca on 22 October 1991. Abraham Lincoln transited the South China Sea from 23 to 25 October 1991. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, moored at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 26 to 29 October 1991. Abraham Lincoln operated in the South China Sea from 30 to 31 October 1991, en route to Hong Kong. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Hong Kong from 1 to 5 November 1991, then sailed for the waters of the North Pacific. Abraham Lincoln participated in MSDF Annualex 03G, a joint U.S. and Japanese exercise with antisubmarine ASW, anti-surface and anti-air warfare ASUW, and AAW training. Maintained continuous on station ASW coverage for 50 hours from 8 to 9 November 1991. Abraham Lincoln inchoped THIRDFLT AOR on 13 November 1991, transiting the North, West and Eastern Pacific from 6 to 25 November 1991. The eight ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group Commanded by COMCARGRU 3, RADM Timothy W. Wright, deployed to the western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf, with Commander, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN, CAPT Stephen L. Webb embarked, the carrier’s first deployment outside of the Western Hemisphere, with Commodore Destroyer Squadron NINE, CAPT John F. Sussilleaux, and ships that include USS Lake Champlain (CG-57); USS Long Beach (CGN-9); USS Merrill (DD-976); USS Gary (FFG-51); USS Ingraham (FFG-61); USS Roanoke (AOR-7) joined USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) as part of her task force. Her second Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (28 May to 25 November 1991)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1991).

 

28-05/91 to 25/11/91

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

 WEST COAST

Joint Meritorious Unit Award

Joint Meritorious Unit Award (JU)

10–28 Jun 1991

1st Westpac deploy.

Southeast Asia Service Medal

Southwest Asia Service Medal (SA)

4–13 Jul 1991

same

Kuwait Liberation Medal

Kuwait Liberation (Kuwait)

2 August 1990 and 31 August 1993 (approved on 16 March 1995)

same

The Kuwait Liberation Medal was approved by the Kuwait Council of Ministers for award in five classes, generally according to the rank of the recipient. The medal was offered by the Chief of Staff of the Kuwait Armed Forces on July 16, 1994. The medal was accepted by Secretary of Defense William J. Perry per memorandum dated 16 March 1995.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuwait_Liberation_Medal_%28Government_of_Kuwait%29

http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Awards/kuwait_liberation.aspx

The US accepted only the fifth grade version for all personnel.

 

Criteria: Awarded to members of the Military Coalition who served in support of Operation Desert Shield or Desert Storm in one or more of the following areas between 2 August 1990 and 31 August 1993: Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman, Gulf of Aden, that portion of the Arabian Sea that lies north of 10 degrees north latitude and west of 68 degrees east longitude, as well as the total land areas of Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrain,

Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. To be eligible,[2] a service member must have been:[3]

 

(1) attached to or regularly serving for one or more days with an organization participating in ground/shore (military) operations;

(2) attached to or regularly serving for one or more days aboard a naval vessel directly supporting military operations;

(3) actually participating as a crew member in one or more aerial flights directly supporting military operations in the areas designated above;

(4) serving on temporary duty for 30 consecutive days or 60 nonconsecutive days. These time limitations may be waived for members participating in actual combat operations.

 

The Government of Kuwait offered the Kuwait Liberation Medal to members of the Armed Forces of the United States by letter dated 16 July 1994. The medal was accepted by Secretary of Defense William J. Perry per memorandum dated 16 March 1995.

The Kuwait version of the Kuwait Liberation Medal is considered junior in precedence to the Saudi Arabian version of the medal.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuwait_Liberation_Medal_(Kuwait)

Ref. - 378A & 378B-1991 to 2004

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 25 November to 31 December 1991” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1991 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter IV

Appendix I

 

 

The ship operated under the following chain of command as of 31 December 1991:

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1991 (Ref. 378B-1991):

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 1991 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President George Herbert Walker Bush, 1989-1993 - 41st

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Richard B. Cheney - 17th
21 Mar 1989 - 20 Jan 1993

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Henry L. Garrett III - 63rd

15 May 1989 - 26 Jun 1992

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Frank B. Kelso (1990 - 1994) - 24th

CINCPACFLT

ADM Charles R. Larson - 51st

15 Feb 1990 - 15 Feb 1991

ADM Robert J. Kelly - 52nd

15 Feb 1991 - 6 Aug 1994

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM Edwin R. Kohn, Jr. - 24th

Dec 1990 - Oct 1993

Commander, COMCARGRU 3

RADM Timothy W. Wright

Chief of Staff, COMCARGRU 3

CAPT Harry M. Dyck, Jr.

Commander, Destroyer Squadron NINE

CAPT John F. Sussilleaux

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1991 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

William B. Hayden - 11 November 1989 - 16 June 1991 (Note 1) /

CAPT James O. Ellis Jr.

Executive Officer - XO

CAPT Michael D. Malone

Administrative Officer

LCDR Richard M. Butts /

LT George M. Schott

Public Affairs Officer (PAO)

LT Larry Thomas

Air Officer

CDR John B. Sandknop /

CDR Larry A. Pacentrilli

AIMD Officer

CDR Kenneth A. Marks

Combat Systems Officer

LCDR Daniel F. Rustchak

Religious Ministries Officer / Command Chaplain

CAPT Edward T. Hill

Dental Officer

CDR Peter G. Seder

Engineering Officer

CDR Wayne K. Tritchler

Deck Department - First Lieutenant

LCDR Andre T. McCray /

LT Mark S. Sassaman

Communications Officer

LCDR Michael J. Cusick

Maintenance Officer

 

Legal Officer - Command Judge Advocate

LCDR James B. Norman

3-M Officer

 

Navigator

CDR David J. Smania

Senior Medical Officer

CDR Jerry W. Rose

Operations Officer

CDR Dale M. Doorly

Reactor Officer

CDR Kenneth J. Taplett

Safety Officer

CDR Lawrence M. Harvey

Supply Officer

CDR Dennis L. Wright

Training Officer

LCDR Glenn R. Tyson

Weapons Officer

CDR David S. Marzola /

CDR Leslie E. Smith

Marine Security Detachment - MARDET

CAPT Philip S. Lark

Commander, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN

CAPT Stephen L. Webb

 

Note 1: PCU Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was officially established 2 October 1987; CDR David P. Keller was designated Officer In Charge (OIC). CAPT J.J. Dantone, the first designated Commanding Officer (CO) reported aboard 14 December 1987 along with the Executive Officer (XO), CDR Stanley W. Bryant. CAPT Dantone was relieved as CO by CAPT Bryant (XO) on 26 September 1988, and transferred to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as CO. CAPT Bryant was relieved by CAPT William B. Hayden on 13 December 1988 and reassumed the duties of XO.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Maiden Cruise Book 1991

 

Ship’s complement:

 

Officers 172

Crew 2,379

 

“The following major accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 1991:

 

In 1991, Lincoln completed a high tempo of carrier operations, including the ship's maiden deployment. Prior to the ship's WestPac,” Lincoln performed carrier qualifications, refresher training, and intense damage control exercises designed to prepare the crew, air wing and battle group for a summer deployment to the Arabian Gulf region. Lincoln, with Carrier Group THREE, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN and Destroyer Squadron NINE embarked, departed May 28 along with a seven-ship battle group to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean.

 

During the WestPac,” Lincoln participated in the largest peacetime evacuation of military dependents ever after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo, Republic of the Philippines. Also, Lincoln headlined national news over the summer as it maintained a strong military presence in the Persian Gulf, enforcing United Nations sanctions against Iraq in the aftermath of hostilities. It was the first carrier to spend an entire summer operating inside the Arabian Gulf. In addition, Lincoln participated in multinational training opportunities with the navies and air forces of several Asian, Middle Eastern and European countries, including Malaysia, Thailand, Oman, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Britain and France.

 

The year culminated with Lincoln’s completion of WestPac” on 25 Nov.

 

The outstanding performance of Lincoln during its WestPac” deployment, especially during operations inside the Arabian Gulf, demonstrated its willingness to stay faithful to its motto, "Shall Not Perish." Lincoln enters 1992 confident of its ability to protect and defend America's vital interests at home and abroad.

 

And that it will continue to be one of America's foremost warships and the fleet's leader” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter IV (1 January to 31 December 1991) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1991 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter IV, Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4